Geek Of The Week: Amelia Earhart

Geek Of The Week: Amelia Earhart

2018 is behind us. Today we post the last GOTW of the year and we’d like to end it with a bang. This week’s geek is none other than Amelia Earhart. She is the quintessential aviation geek. In addition to being the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, Earhart was also the founder of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. This aviation geek set many records in her short lifetime. Some of them are listed below:

  • Woman’s world altitude record: 14,000 ft (1922)
  • First woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean (1928)
  • Speed records for 100 km (and with 500 lbs cargo) (1931)
  • First woman to fly an autogyro (1931)
  • Altitude record for autogyros: 18,415 ft (1931)
  • First person to cross the United States in an autogyro (1932)
  • First woman to fly the Atlantic solo (1932)
  • First person to fly the Atlantic twice (1932)
  • First woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross (1932)
  • First woman to fly nonstop, coast-to-coast across the US (1933)
  • Women’s speed transcontinental record (1933)
  • First person to fly solo between Honolulu, Hawaii and Oakland, California (1935)
  • First person to fly solo from Los Angeles, California to Mexico City, Mexico (1935)
  • First person to fly solo nonstop from Mexico City, Mexico to Newark, New Jersey (1935)
  • Speed record for east-to-west flight from Oakland, California to Honolulu, Hawaii (1937)
  • First person to fly solo from the Red Sea to Karachi (1937)
To say this amazing woman changed aviation forever would be an understatement. She redefined what was possible and did it with grace and poise. Alas, her plane disappeared in 1937 and Earhart was never heard from again. There are several theories about what happened, but regardless, this geek changed history and blazed a trail for millions of aviators to follow.

About the Author

avatar KALE: A geek who works in the IT Security field and lives in Dallas, TX. He is also a music geek who has played in several local bands. Previous to his IT career, Kale worked as a photojournalist. He brings technical advice and artistic counterpoint to the podcast.