Is Facial Recognition Software A Privacy Invasion?

Is Facial Recognition Software A Privacy Invasion?

When Facebook added facial recognition software back in 2011, there was an uproar from online privacy advocates. Even more concerns arose when Google announced they were adding it to their augmented reality glasses. Now, privacy groups are lobbying for legislation around the use of this technology. They argue that tracking an image of a person’s face is far more invasive than tracking an anonymous online identity. Tracking a person’s image has far more serious security concerns.

Two methods of legislation are being discussed, the first requires companies to ask an individual before they can use their image. This is called the “opt in” method. The second is called the “opt out” method and it allows companies to use a person’s image without asking, but requires them to remove it if requested. In other words, the first requires the merchant to ask permission and the second requires the customer to be proactive. Needless to say, most of the privacy groups are favoring the former method.

About the Author

avatar KALE: A geek who works in the IT field and lives in Dallas, TX. He is also a music geek who has played in several local bands. Previous to his IT career, Kale worked as a photojournalist. He brings technical advice and artistic counterpoint to the podcast.